6 unexpected research findings in productivity research

 

frankensteinResearch finds and tries to find productivity improvements from different places. Here you can find six different findings related to productivity.

1. Internet temptation at work lowers employee productivity

Surfing the Internet wastes time reserved for your employer, but according to research forbidding it reduces it more. If the usage of internet is forbidden you need a lot more willpower to resist the temptation not to do it.

Better than forbidding Internet is to prevent it completely or arrange breaks for use.

 

2. Cute pictures of kittens increase productivity

This one is probably most known and most widespread study.

According to Japanese study. Looking pictures of Cat kittens increases productivity.

 

3. Plants can increase your productivity 25%

The Areca Palm, the Mother-in-Law’s-Tongue, and the Money Plant are air filtering plants that can make you healthier. In a study performed by GreenSpaces, they discovered that these plants can reduce eye irritation, respiratory symptoms, headaches, lung impairment and asthma.

 
All that adds up to an average increase of general productivity of 25%

 

4. Warmer office reduces typing errors and increases productivity

Cornell University finds that raising temperature from 68F (20C) to 77F (25C) reduced typing errors 44 percent and output increased 150 percent!

 

5. Productivity rises when companies are facing closure

Örebro University in Sweden found out that when decision to close company has been made, the productivity drops, but after everything is clear and negotiations are done, productivity rises.

One reason is that the managers are busy handling other things than the usual management and people who do the work, take over the responsibility, which increases the productivity.

 

6. People who do not have email are more productive

U.S. Army researchers found out that people who did not have email available were more productive, felt less stressed and in general feel better.

People with email switched computer windows average 37 times per hour and people without email only 18 times per hour.

 

  • http://blog.relenta.com/ Dmitri Eroshenko @Relenta

    “People with email switched computer windows average 37 times per hour and people without email only 18 times per hour.” That makes sense. I am surprised the difference is only 2-fold. But what if you can’t stop using email? Like if you’re in a customer-facing job? And customers are conditioned to expect a response in 2 minutes? That’s when it gets real sticky. I’ve written about this a while back:

    http://blog.relenta.com/email-is-dead-long-live-email-crm

    • http://www.betterproductivityblog.com/ Rami Rantala

      It is true that there are jobs that require the usage of email and then you need to invest in proper tools to do it.

      Most of us don’t need it as much as we think. We can easily go with checking email twice per day and instead of email use other ways to communicate.

      • http://blog.relenta.com/ Dmitri Eroshenko @Relenta

        I’ve heard of the apps that let you set the limit on frequency of email-checking. Also some friends of mine have installed an app that limits Facebook time to 5 or 10 minutes per day.

  • Jon Tera

    The last point which you have explained about the email id, I do not agree
    with it. Email connectivity is very important in the professional world.

  • http://hitask.com/ Rick Ben

    The last point which you have explained about the email id,
    I do not agree with it. Email connectivity is very important in the
    professional world.
    http://hitask.com

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